Aash (Iranian thick Soup)

Aush (Persian: آش‎) sometimes transliterated as ash, aash, or āsh, is a thick soup/stew, which is usually served hot and is part of Iranian cuisine. Aush means thick soup in the Persian language.

Depending on the type of Aash is typically made with a variation of ingredients but may include; flat wheat noodles, turmeric, vegetables (broccoli, carrots, onion, celery, spinach, garlic, jalapeño), legumes (chickpeas, kidney beans), herbs (dill, mint, coriander, minced cilantro), yogurt and ground lamb, beef or chicken, onions, oil and spices.

Aash can be considered a full meal or appetizer. Aash can often be bought in Persian stores canned, as dried mixes or frozen.

show Iranian food

History:

Ash is a genuine and traditional Persian cuisine that is cooked throughout Iran, based on the nature of the geographic regions. The importance of this food in the Iranian table is so much that word of Aash-Paz (cooker) come from it. It means in past everyone who can cook Aash was a cooker.

Or in Persian language say Aash-Paz-Khane (kitchen), means a place to make the Aash. As you see Aash was one of the important main foods in Iranian diet, but why? In each area, the Aash is cooked by the available materials in the same area so the first reason is availability.

Usually recipe of Aash is simple; the material is poured into the pot and placed on the heat so people can go for other works so second reason is easy to cook.

Most of The material used in Aash was produce in family or neighborhood so it was a cheap food. Third reason is cheap.

Because of using many vegetables and spices, it is a Delicious and varied food.

Iranian traditional food

Variety:

Nowadays Iranian people cook much kind of Aash and still this food is one of Indestructible Iranian Table.

There are more than 50 types of this Iranian thick soup (Aash); Aash Reshteh (noodles) being one of the more popular types. Some other well-known Aash are Aash-e Anar (pomegranate), ash-e-jo (barley), Aash-e Doogh, Aash Shole-Ghalam-Kar (with meat and beans), Aash-e Goje (tomato) and Aash-e Torsh (beet/pickle). The Iranian variation of Aash often is served with a garnish (na’na dagh) of fried mint oil, garlic chips, and/or shallot chips.

 

If you want to experience cooking Aash click here.

show Iranian food

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *